B.O.B Jogging Stroller Recall Follows Choking Reports

Nearly half a million B.O.B. jogging strollers have been recalled from the market after reports of children removing the logo patch and nearly choking on it. 

The B.O.B. jogging stroller recall was announced by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Health Canada on October 11, after B.O.B. Trailers Inc., the manufacturer, received at least six reports of children detaching an embroidered logo patch and mouthing it. Two children were rescued from gagging and choking on the patch without injury.

All of the reports involved children who were in an infant car seat attached to the stroller. The patch is an embroidered logo on the stroller’s canopy. The CPSC has determined that it represents a choking hazard to babies and young children.

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The stroller recall affects about 411,700 strollers sold in the U.S. and another 27,000 sold in Canada. All B.O.B. single and double jogging strollers manufactured between November 1998 and November 2010 are affected by the recall. All of the affected strollers have BOB, Ironman or Stroller Strides logos embroidered on the canopy. Strollers manufactured after October 2006 have a white label on the back of the stroller’s leg with the manufacturing date.

The strollers were sold at REI, Babies R’ Us and other children’s product stores, as well as at some sporting goods stores, nationwide, as well as through Amazon.com from November 1998 through October 2011 for between $280 and $600. The strollers were manufactured in Taiwan and China.

About 357,000 of the same strollers were recalled in February for a strangulation hazard caused by the canopy’s drawstring. That B.O.B. jogging stroller recall came after an 11-month-old girl nearly strangled.

The CPSC recommends that any consumers using strollers affected by the latest recall stop using them until they remove the embroidery backing patch from the inside of the canopy’s logo. Consumers can contact B.O.B. for instructions on properly removing the patch by calling (855) 242-2245 or by visiting the firm’s website at www.bobnotices.com.

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