Remington Rifle Recall Issued Due to Model 700, Seven Trigger Problems

After years of complaints involving problems with Remington rifles accidentally firing, Remington Arms Company has issued a recall for Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with X-Mark Pro (XMP) triggers.  

The Remington rifle recall was announced on April 11, indicating that problems with the XMP triggers may cause the rifles to unintentionally discharge under certain circumstances.

According to the gun maker, an internal investigation has suggested that too much bonding agent may have been used in the assembly process for the rifles, resulting in the risk of accidental discharge.

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Remington 700 and Model Seven Rifles May Pose a Risk of Unintentional Firing Due to Trigger Problems.

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The recall notice does not disclose how many incidents, injuries or deaths were caused by the defective rifles, but several Remington rifle lawsuits and class action claims have been filed against the company by individuals injured when the bolt-action rifle fired unexpectedly.

The recall only affects rifles Remington 700 and Seven model rifles manufactured between May 1, 2006 and April 9, 2014, but some user complaints have suggested that the problem may be far more extensive.

According to allegations raised in a Remington 700 rifle class action lawsuit filed in January 2013, unintentional discharges have been linked to problems with Remington’s Walker Fire Control, which has been used since 1948 and is found in more than 5,000,000 Remington guns. That complaint claimed that Remington has known since at least 1979 that one percent of all Model 700 rifles fire unexpectedly without the trigger being pulled because of defects in the fire control assembly. The lawsuits also claim the company knew about the problems before the gun went on the market.

In 1978, the gun manufacturer issued a recall for the Model 600 series, which used the same fire control system, determining that it had a 55.9% failure rate. The class action complaint filed last year claims that the Model 700 system has the same problems. The parties in that case are expected to propose a briefing schedule for the Plaintiffs’ Motion for Class Certification in that case next month.

The current recall only applies to Remington 700 and Model Seven rifles featuring the XMP triggers. Remington indicates that it is recalling all affected products to fully inspect and clean the XMP triggers with a specialized process. Until that is complete, Remington has advised all customers to stop using the recalled rifles and return them to Remington free of charge.

“While we have the utmost confidence in the design of the XMP trigger, we are undertaking this recall in the interest of customer safety, to remove any potential excess bonding agent applied in the assembly process,” said Remington Director of Public Affairs and Communications Teddy Novin. “Our goal is to have every recalled firearm inspected, specialty cleaned, tested and returned as soon as possible.”

Remington has launched a website to help owners determine if their rifle is affected by the recall through the serial number. Owners can also call (800) 243-9700 for more information.

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3 Comments

  • MichaelJune 30, 2020 at 1:33 am

    I have never understood this problem with the Model 700 rifles. Myself my father my uncles and grandfather all owned the 700 rifles. I cannot recall one accidental firing of the Remington 700. I’ve hunted from Maine to California using this firearm. Honestly I don’t know who these people are that have had serious injuries or death from its use. The rifle will not fire a bullet unless it is misused[Show More]I have never understood this problem with the Model 700 rifles. Myself my father my uncles and grandfather all owned the 700 rifles. I cannot recall one accidental firing of the Remington 700. I’ve hunted from Maine to California using this firearm. Honestly I don’t know who these people are that have had serious injuries or death from its use. The rifle will not fire a bullet unless it is misused or some kind of interference with the trigger. This biggest issue I have with these folks is this. This rifle is a bolt action which means that you must rack a round into the chamber by activating the bolt. WHO the hell racks a round into the chamber and goes running around?????. The weapon is a safe firearm, it’s the unsafe gun owner in most cases that are to blame (truth be known). Unsafe and misinformed. It’s easy to blame the gun as these folks jump on the lawsuit bandwagon. I would like to know how many accidental firings from the 700 recall, I would venture to say that there were none. I’m 68 years old and owned and hunted with many different rifles. I have never had an accidental firing nor do I know anyone who has. It is no wonder to me that many gun manufacturers aren’t willing to do business in California because of the bullshit that they are put through to meet ridiculous standards that cost companies millions just to get a drop test for their weapons. Drop Test??? Are you kidding me. I have dropped, kicked, thrown, flung, or otherwise hammered pistols and rifles without one firing accidentally. It is the irresponsible and misinformed people who shouldn’t own firearms. I believe that Remington is just another gun manufacturer who is being sued by individuals who want a big payday. All manufacturers of firearms have to meet certain standards and go above and beyond testing their guns before they are sold to the public. Certainly any gun that fired accidentally would be flagged for malfunction and fixed. I speak with lots of experience with firearms and I have found that almost all accidentally fired Model 700s one will find that it was operator error. The last thing I will say regarding this is that I had only one problem with a firearm and it was a jammed M-16 in Vietnam. A little cleaning and some oil, end of story.

  • BobSeptember 3, 2014 at 6:43 pm

    If I can give anybody some advice, if you have one of these recalled rifles like I do, you are better off spending money on a Timney trigger. Remington has had my rifle for over a month now, and when I called them today, I was told it could take up to 12 weeks for me to get my rifle back. So much for hunting season, for me! I will never, ever buy another Remington product again.

  • robertAugust 27, 2014 at 12:29 am

    Never had a problem with the two 700 rifles I have had only have one now that is my boys just ordered a timney trigger just to be on the safe side . With proper handling even with a misfire no one would get shot. Will install myself due to hunting season coming soon and I may not get the gun back .Its worth buying the trigger ourselves to make sure we have a safe gun and we have it for deer season[Show More]Never had a problem with the two 700 rifles I have had only have one now that is my boys just ordered a timney trigger just to be on the safe side . With proper handling even with a misfire no one would get shot. Will install myself due to hunting season coming soon and I may not get the gun back .Its worth buying the trigger ourselves to make sure we have a safe gun and we have it for deer season here in maine the 700 is a great gun and have had nothing but good things to say about the Remington arms company in dealing with them over the years

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