RSS
TwitterFacebook

Femur Fracture Suits Against Fosamax Generic Manufacturers Dismissed

  • Written by: Staff Writers
  • 2 Comments

As part of the continuing fallout from a recent Supreme Court decision that prevents consumers from holding generic drug makers responsible for dangerous and defective medications they sell, all federal lawsuits over femur fractures caused by Fosamax generic equivalents will be dismissed.

U.S. District Court Judge Joel Pisano has issued an ordered that will result in the dismissal of all claims against generic defendants, including Teva Pharmaceuticals, Barr Pharmaceuticals, Mylan Pharmaceuticals, Apotex Corporation, Sun Pharmaceuticals, Caraco Pharmaceuticals Laboratories and Cobalt Laboratories.

A similar order dismissing Watson Pharmaceuticals from generic Fosamax lawsuits over femur fractures was issued earlier this year by Judge Pisano.

All of the cases involve allegations that generic version of Fosamax (alendronate sodium) caused users to suffer sudden femur fractures, which typically occur with little or no trauma. Plaintiffs allege that the generic drug makers knew or should have known about the femur fracture side effects of Fosamax, but failed to adequately warn consumers or the medical community.

Most of the lawsuits were filed after the FDA forced drug makers to add new warnings in October 2010, providing consumers with information about the risk of sudden femur fractures and urging them to seek immediate medical attention if they experience new groin pain or thigh pain while taking the popular osteoporosis drug, which can be symptoms that occur weeks or months before a complete femur fracture from Fosamax.

The dismissals comes as consequence of a June 2011 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in PLIVA v. Mensing, which allows generic drug makers to avoid liability for failure to warn about harmful or even deadly side effects of medications they make, since FDA regulations require that their products must carry the same warnings as the name-brand versions.

According to the order, all cases filed on or before January 31, 2012 are dismissed as to any generic drug makers. For all cases filed since February 1, 2012, plaintiffs have 30 days to file a petition for exception to show why their case should be exempt from the dismissal.

The dismissals do not apply to lawsuits against Merck & Co., which makes the name brand version of the drug.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

2 comments

  1. NF Harris Reply

    My right femur bone broke on Oct. 2, 2010. Just wondering if my lawsuit was dismissed. My understanding was prior to 9-14-2010 all cases were dismissed. I would like to know if my lawsuit was or was not dismissed. Your comments will be greatly appreciated. I am 78 years old and both of my femur bones has been broken and the left has been broken twice. I will never get my balance back like it use to be. This has taken a toll on my life. I might as well try to get use to this as it will be like this as long as I live.

  2. AS Murphy Reply

    I am looking for a new attorney to handle my Fosamax case. I have a pending Fosamax case against Merk Pharmaceautical Drugs, sitting in the Superior Court of California, County of Orange. My lawyer just informed me that their office is no longer representing my case since they lost a lot of million dollars representing their clients, They had a separate case tried this year and they said they lost. They wanted me to dismiss my case and if not they will seek the court to dismiss it. My case is unique – I had two hip surgeries – I broke my two legs in one-month time due to Fosamax in 2009. Please let me know if you could handle my case. Thank you.

  • Share Your Comments

  • Have Your Comments Reviewed by a Lawyer

    Provide additional contact information if you want an attorney to review your comments and contact you about a potential case. This information will not be published.
  • NOTE: Providing information for review by an attorney does not form an attorney-client relationship.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.