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Truvada and Other HIV Drug Lawsuits

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Lawsuits allege that side effects of Truvada, Viread, Atripla, Complera and Stribild may have been avoided if the manufacturer had not withheld safer versions of the HIV drugs as part of a scheme to maximize profits.

TDF DRUG LAWSUIT STATUS: Product liability lawyers are reviewing potential HIV drug lawsuits for individuals who have suffered:

  • Kidney Disease, Kidney Failure or Other Renal Injury
  • Bone Fractures
  • Osteoporosis, Osteopenia, Osteomalacia or other Bone Loss Problems

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MANUFACTURER: Gilead

OVERVIEW: A series of HIV treatments have been introduced in recent years, involving the compound tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which allowed the medications to be delivered in a pill form, instead of an injection. These treatments included the blockbuster Gilead HIV drugs:

  • Truvada
  • Viread
  • Atripla
  • Complera
  • Stribild

It now appear that Gilead knew that safer version of these HIV drugs could be manufactured and sold, known as tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF). However, the drug maker stopped development of this compound in 2004, continuing to introduce toxic TDF drugs without adequately warning about the potential side effects on the kidneys and bones.

It was not until Gilead was nearing the end of patent protection for TDF drugs, and would soon face competition from generic versions of Truvada, Viread, Atripla, Complera and Stribild, that it resumed development of TAF drugs, which are now marketed as a safer alternative.

TDF DRUG SIDE EFFECTS: Tenofovir is part of a class of antiretrovirals used to treat and prevent HIV, by blocking an enzyme the disease needs to replicate. Sales of the compound were initially limited, since it had to be delivered through an injection. However, this changed in 2001, with the introduction of Viread and other TDF-based drugs, which provide tenofovir in pill form.

Gilead developed an essential monopoly on HIV antiretrovirals, which individuals living with the disease must take to survive, generating over $11 billion in annual sales.

As early as 2001, Gilead knew that side effects of TDF HIV drugs could be highly toxic to kidneys and bones, but inadequate warnings were provided to users and the medical community.

The drug maker also knew about a safer alternative by 2004, but stopped development of TAF drugs, since they would negatively impact the lucrative sales of Truvada, Viread and the other TDF drugs.

According to allegations raised in TDF drug class action lawsuits and individual injury claims, Gilead engaged in a scheme to maximize profits by delaying development of the safe TAF drugs until after they had generated the maximum profits from TDF drugs. When generic versions of the earlier drugs were approaching the market, the manufacturer obtained approval for TAF drugs, which will not face generic equivalents until at least 2032.

LAWSUITS OVER TDF DRUG TOXICITY: As a result of the drug manufacturers’ failure to adequately ensure the safety of their products or warn about the risks associated with TDF toxicity, HIV drug injury lawyers are evaluating whether users may be entitled to compensation through a product liability lawsuit.

To request a free consultation and claim evaluation to determine whether you, a friend or family member may be entitled to financial compensation through a lawsuit, submit information about a potential kidney or bone loss injury.

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