Power Bank Cell Phone Charger Recall Issued After Fire

More than 170,000 “power bank” cell phone chargers have been recalled, following consumer complaints that suggest the devices may overheat and potentially catch on fire when either being charged or charging another device. 

The Two-Tone Power Bank Charger recall was announced by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) on November 19, following at least three reports that the portable cell phone chargers overheated, including at least one incident where a fire occurred and caused property damage.

The devices are a portable and rechargeable self-contained energy source designed to allow users to charge their cell phones or other compatible devices when an electrical outlet is not available. The cell phone chargers are typically left charging at a wall outlet of the home to allow users to carry the charging device with them in case a power supply is needed.

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The Two-Tone Power Bank Chargers are rectangular and measure approximately 3.6 inches long by 1 inch high by 1 inch wide. The portable chargers have a white top at the charging outlet and have either a black, dark blue, lime green, light blue, orange, pink, purple, red, white, or yellow casing. Recalled cell phone chargers contain the letters “OUT DC5V” and “IN DC5V” on the top of the chargers and have the name and/or logo of the organization that gave away the charger as a promotional item.

The Power Bank Chargers were manufactured in China under AP Specialties where the products were given out or sold as promotional products at various meetings, trade shows, and industry conventions from November 2013 to August 2014 for between $8 and $11.

The CPSC recommends that consumers stop using the recalled portable cell phone chargers and contact AP Specialties at 888-877-7221, or visit them online at www.apspecialties.com and click on “Product Recall” for information on how to receive a free replacement. AP Specialties officials say they plan to send customers an envelope and label with instructions on how to return the power bank free of charge and upon receipt will send a replacement charger to the return address.

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